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System Surveyor Blog

How the Internet of Things (IoT) Relates to Surveillance and Security

Internet of Things

Surveillance Cameras Part of Internet of Things

With the advent of Cloud technology, the notion of connecting any and every device to the Internet with an on and off switch became a reality. According to Forbes, in the last few years, the Internet of Things has taken off and is rapidly growing across the world. No longer is the Internet confined to computers and mobile devices, it is now available to nearly every device that has an IP address, from microwaves and refrigerators to wearable devices and headphones. As IoT develops, the relationship is between people-people, people-things, and things-things creating the opportunity to connect billions of devices.

According to Job Security UK, the Internet of Things is defined as the trend for the Internet to expand from something that most people only use through their personal computer, or mobile device, to something that is connected to everyday things.

While this idea seems like it would provide countless opportunities for the security industry, it happens to be posing numerous challenges as well. In Wired Mazagine’s article “ The Biggest Security Threats We’ll Face in 2016”, the author included surveillance CCTV cameras as IoT devices that are being used by hackers to gain entry into corporate IT networks. This creates new cybersecurity challenges with precisely the technology being used to protect the organization and provide security.

The security industry needs to quickly get a grip on keeping hackers out of devices connected through IoT by establishing more secure firewalls and monitoring, that alert the security leaders of a potential hacker.

This includes the need for better inventory of the assets that are connected to the IP network. In many organizations, security equipment alone makes up hundreds or thousands of devices under management including but not limited to access control, intrusion detection, video surveillance cameras, appliances, sensors and other key technology devices. Getting a handle on everything that connects to the network from a security perspective is a great place to start. That’s where System Surveyor comes in.

The introduction of IoT only touches the surface of what we’ll see in terms of applications for networked devices. So to all you future security industry employees, get your hacking gloves and tech-savvy hats on because it’s going to be a bumpy road for the industry. Remember the benefits of IoT for the industry, and work to prevent the dangers posed by your competition, IoT hackers.